Current Exhibitions 

Fore and Aft: A Vitreous View of Time

August 18, 2018–March 31, 2019
Image for Fore and Aft: A Vitreous View of Time Beth Lipman, InEarth, Glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, 2017 (detail); Photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
This special exhibition presents the work of three leading Wisconsin artists—Beth Lipman, Jeremy Popelka, and Eoin Breadon—who embrace the challenge of glass, variously referencing and rejecting the medium’s workaday functionality to explore its relationship with light, form, and time. Each work is thoughtfully installed to reverberate in conversation with MOWA’s permanent collection, priming viewers to reflect on the unassuming art historical resonances of each artist’s work. Taking inspiration from Irish storytelling, Dutch still lives, and architectonic forms, these sculptures bridge the past and the present.

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David R. Harper: A Fear of Unknown Origin

August 11–December 30, 2018
Image for David R. Harper: A Fear of Unknown Origin
Comprised of seventy-two ceramic sculptures of animal heads glazed in various shades of blue, A Fear of Unknown Origin is inspired by two things that seem completely unrelated. The first inspiration comes from the cyanometer, an esoteric tool alpinists used to measure distance by the shades of the sky. The second is the idiom “Entre le Chien et le Loup” (between the dog and the wolf), which describes the effects of dusk and being unable to differentiate between friend or foe. Harper’s installation unifies the two with a gradual gradient of blue and a corresponding range of expressions, from smiles to snarls.

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Craig Blietz: Herd

October 13, 2018–January 13, 2019
Image for Craig Blietz: Herd
Herd, Door County artist Craig Blietz’s first solo exhibition at MOWA, features a new body of work of twenty-three large-scale paintings that depict his beloved cows. Created specifically for MOWA’s white-cube gallery, Blietz’s heroic cow parade is the perfect marriage between barnyard chic and SoHo hip. Blietz places his impeccably drawn cows front and center, allowing them to float in a depthless background of muted agrarian symbols, such as sunflowers, corn stalks, and barns. The abstract designs of his cowhides read like boldly patterned canvases within canvases. The resulting scenes—part Barbizon School, part psychedelic, part Robert Motherwell—are a unique contribution to American art and deserve attention beyond the Midwest.

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Corey Fells: 100 Womxn Project

October 13, 2018–January 13, 2019
Image for Corey Fells: 100 Womxn Project
Active military specialist and photographer Corey Fells grew up in one of the most segregated cities in the United States—Milwaukee—which has significantly impacted his artistic perspective. 100 Womxn Project is a celebration of diversity, resilience, and womanhood. Inspired by his late mother, Fells set out to document 100 minority millennials from across the city. Each photograph was taken in front of the same ivy-covered wall, creating a visual continuity that reflects the shared experience underlying each unique individual. Their pictures and stories chronicle their hopes, dreams, trials, and tribulations as well as their aspirations.

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Jason S. Yi: Reconfiguring MOWA's Landscape

Starting July 16, 2018
Image for Jason S. Yi: Reconfiguring MOWA Jason S. Yi, The Legend of the White Snake, PVC tubes and connectors, 2017
Yi’s site-specific outdoor installation, The Legend of the White Snake, will become part of MOWA’s own reimagined landscape starting the week of July 16. Coming to West Bend from downtown Milwaukee—where it was part of the ongoing public art project Sculpture Milwaukee—the work is entirely constructed from PVC, forming a dynamic tangle of tubes that towers over viewers like a scribble incarnate. The Legend of the White Snake reconfigures the landscape and engages interest from every vantage point.

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Kenn Kwint: Primitive Marks

October 3, 2018–January 8, 2019
Image for Kenn Kwint: Primitive Marks
Kenn Kwint describes his paintings as “primitive marks on a sophisticated ground.” He initiates his creative practice without any preconceived subject matter, allowing his abstractions and portraits to gradually emerge out of intricate lines and layers of paint. The highly tactile and emotionally charged results testify to Kwint’s passionate love affair with the act of painting. This exhibition draws on a recent gift from the Kohler Foundation of sixteen works spanning several decades, which show Kwint to be adept with oils, acrylics, ink, and prints.

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